Monday.COME "About the Execution by Dogs: How we should see North Korea?"

Monday.COME "About the Execution by Dogs: How we should see North Korea?"

02/2014

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Towards the end of 2013, Takungpao reported that Kim Jong-un executed his uncle Jang Song-thaek by feeding him to dogs alive. It is hard to tell whether this is true or not, but it has surely got people talking about it.

News from North Korea is becoming more and more dramatic and even entertaining: Kim’s ex-girlfriend being gunned down for allegedly violating laws on pornography; North Korea announcing that they have successfully landed on the sun. It is almost gossip news that builds up the world’s impression of the country.

These stories about North Korea mainly come from the rumors and information from South Korea. Are these sources good ways to understand this mysterious country? Could Kremlinology help us understand North Korea more accurately?

Steve Chung Lok-wai is the Assistant Lecturer from Global Studies of the Chinese University of Hong Kong and is a PhD candidate of Korean Studies at the University of Sydney. He was a scholar from the Academy of Korean Studies and his thesis is on how North Korea affects South Korea’s media and politics. His research interests include the politics and social culture of South Korea, the relationship between the two Koreas, North Korea’s nuclear weapons and foreign policy and its economic reform.

Date: February 17, 2014 (Monday)
Time: 12:30pm – 2:00pm
Venue: NAH 313
Speakers:
CHUNG Lok Wai (Assistant Lecturer, Global Studies Programme, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
Host: MA Shu Yun (Chairman, Department of Government and Public Administration, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
Language: Cantonese (Putonghua and English can be used in discussion)
Lunch: HK$10 (The School and GPA Department subsidize the remainder. Lunch is provided for REGISTERED participants only.)


Notes: Monday.COME is open to the staff members and students of the School of Journalism and Communication and the Department of Government and Public Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong only. It is closed to the press.

Alias : mon20140217

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