School of Journalism and Communication, CUHK - 陳萱庭
 

陳萱庭

chen hsuan ting

陳萱庭
助理教授


 
B.A.
National Chung Cheng University

M.A.
University of Texas at Austin

Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

 

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 icon research Research Interests:

  • Public Opinion and Political Communication
  • Media Psychology and Media Effects
  • New Media Technologies

 icon research Current Research:

  • Online political expression
  • Selective Exposure
  • Cross-Cutting Exposure

 icon researchTeaching Interests:

  • Multimedia Journalism and Web Publishing
  • Media Psychology and Users' Behavior
  • New Media Effects and Politics
  • Internet and Democracy
  • Communication Research Methods

 icon aboutAdvice to students:

Be a positive thinker

icon researchPublication List:

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Chen, H.-T. (in press). Personal issue importance and motivated-reasoning goals for pro- and counterattitudinal exposure: A moderated mediation model of motivations and information selectivity on elaborative reasoning. International Journal of Public Opinion Research.

Chan, M., Chen, H.-T., & Lee, F. L. F. (in press). Examining the roles of mobile and social media in political participation: A cross-national analysis of three Asian societies using a communication mediation approach. New Media & Society.

Chen, H.-T., & Li, X. (2017). The contribution of mobile social media to social capital and psychological well-being: Examining the role of communicative use, friending and self-disclosure. Computers in Human Behavior, 75, 958-965.

Chen, H.-T., Gan, C. & Sun, P. (2017). How does political satire influence political participation? Examining the role of counter- and proattitudinal exposure, anger, and personal issue importance. International Journal of Communication, 11, 3011-3029.

Lee, F. L. F., Chen, H.-T., & Chan, M. (2017). Social media use and university students’ participation in a large-scale protest campaign: The case of Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement. Telematics and Informatics, 34(2), 457-469.

Chen, H. T, Chan, M. & Lee, F. L. F. (2016). Social media use and democratic engagement: A comparative study of Hong Kong, Taiwan, and China. Chinese Journal of Communication.

Kim, Y., Chen, H., & Wang, Y. (2016). Living in the smartphone age: Examining the conditional indirect effects of mobile phone use on political participation. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, vol. 60, no. 3, 1-20.

Kim, Y., & Chen, H. T. (2016). Social media and online political participation: The mediating role of exposure to cross-cutting and like-minded perspectives. Telematics and Informatics, 33(2), 320-330.

Chen, H., & Chen, W. (2015). Couldn't or wouldn't? The influence of privacy concerns and self-efficacy in privacy management on privacy protection. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 18(1), 13-19. doi: 10.1089/cyber.2014.0456

Chen, H., Sun, P., & Gan, C. (2015). Far from reach but near at hand: The role of social media for cross-national mobilization. Computers in Human Behavior, 53, 443-451. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2015.05.052

Chu, S.-C., Chen, H., & Sung, Y. (2015). Following brands on Twitter: An extension of theory of planned behavior. International Journal of Advertising. doi: 10.1080/02650487.2015.1037708

Kim, Y., & Chen, H. (2015). Discussion network heterogeneity matters: Examining a moderated mediation model of social media use and civic engagement. International Journal of Communication, 9, 2344-2365.

Chen, H. & Kim, Y. (2013). Problematic use of social network sites: The interactive relationship between gratifications sought and privacy concerns. Cyberpsychology, Behaviors, and Social Networking 16(11), 806-812.

Kim, Y., Chen, H., & Gil de Zúñiga, H. (2013). Stumbling upon news on the Internet: Effects of incidental news exposure and relative entertainment use on political engagement. Computers in Human Behavior, 29(6), 2607-2614.

Chen, H. (2012). Multiple issue publics in the high-choice media environment: Media use, online activity, and political knowledge. Asian Journal of Communication, 22(6), 621-641.

Chen, H. & Kim, Y. (2011). Attacking or self-promoting? The influence of tone of advertising and issue relevance on candidate evaluations and the likelihood of voting for an emerging challenger in Korea. International Journal of Strategic Communication, 5(4), 261-280.

 

Book Chapter

Chen, H. (2012). Personalized realities: Media fragmentation in society. In A. W. Hinsley, K. Kaufhold & S. C. Lewis (Eds.), The future of news: An agenda of perspectives (2 ed., pp. 81-86). San Diego, CA: Cognella.

 

Conference Papers and Presentations

Kim, Y., Chen, H., & Kim, B. (2016). Does smartphone make people smart? A conditional indirect effect of smartphone use for news on political knowledge. Paper presented in the 66th Annual International Communication Association (ICA) Conference, Fukuoka, Japan.

Chan, M., Chen, H., & Lee, F. L. F. (2016). Examining the effects of mobile and social media news on political participation: A cross-national analysis of three Asian societies using a communication mediation approach. Paper presented in the 66th Annual International Communication Associtation (ICA) Conference, Fukuoka, Japan.

Chan, M., Chen, H., & Lee, F. L. F. (2015). Mobile news, social media news, and political participation in three Asian societies: An examination of direct and indirect effects using the O-S-R-O-R model. Paper presented in the Social Media & Society Conference, Toronto, Canada.

Chen, H., Saldaña, M., & Gil de Zúñiga, H. (2015, May). How You Are Motivated to Talk Matters: A Moderated Mediation Model of Political Discussion. Paper presented in the International Communication Association, Puerto Rico, USA.

Chen, H., Sun, P., & Gan, C. (2015, May). Far from reach but near at hand: The role of social media for cross-national mobilization. Paper presented in the International Communication Association, Puerto Rico, USA.

Kim, Y., Chen, H., & Wang, Y. (2015, May). Living in the smartphone age: Examining the conditional indirect effects of mobile phone use on political participation. Paper presented in the International Communication Association, Puerto Rico, USA.

Chen, H. (2014). Bridging the gap between deliberative and participatory democracy: Issue publics' information selectivity, deliberation and participation". Paper presented in the International Communication Association, Seattle, USA.

Chen, H. (2014). Capturing issue publics with attitude attributes and issue-specificity: The conceptualization and operationalization". Paper presented in the International Communication Association, Seattle, USA.

Chen, H., Lee. S., & Gil de Zúñiga, H. (2012, August). Issue publics and exposure to cross-cutting political views: The mediating effects of motivations for discussion and the contribution to discussion elaboration. Accepted to the 2012 annual conference of American Political Science Association, Public Opinion and Political Communication Divisions, New Orleans, LA.

Chen, H., Jeong, S., & Gil de Zúñiga, H. (2012, May). Issue public and online political expression: The mediating effects on exposure to cross-cutting political views and political participation. Paper presented at the 2012 annual conference of International Communication Association, Political Communication Division, Phoenix, AZ.

Kim, Y. & Chen, H. (2012, May). Social media and political participation: The mediating role of exposure to cross-cutting perspectives and like-minded perspectives. Paper presented at the 2012 annual conference of International Communication Association, Mass Communication and Society Division, Phoenix, AZ

Chen, H. & Kim, Y. (2011 August). Political talk shows in Taiwan: Multiple issue publics, political efficacy and their relationships to political knowledge, participation and attitude. Paper presented at the 2011 annual conference of the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Political Communication Interest Group, St. Louis, MO.

Kim, Y. & Chen, H. (2011, August). Does disagreement mitigate polarization? How partisan media use and disagreement affect political polarization. Paper presented at the 2011 annual conference of the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Mass Communication and Society Division, St. Louis, MO.

Chen, H. (2011, May). Multiple issue public membership and its relationship with media use and political knowledge: The role of selectivity and issue capacity. Paper presented at the 2011 annual conference of International Communication Association, Mass Communication and Society Division, Boston, MA.

Kim, Y., Chen, H., & Gil de Zúñiga, H. (2010, August). Does the Internet lead to fragmentation? Relationships of relative entertainment use and incidental news exposure with political knowledge and participation. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Mass Communication and Society Division, Denver, CO.

Chen, H. (2009, August). Gaining gratifications or losing privacy on social-networking sites? Exploring privacy concerns and the relationship with gratifications and Internet addiction. Presented at the annual conference of the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Communication Technology Division, Boston, MA.

Kim, Y. & Chen, H. (2009, August). Attacking or self-promoting: The impact of political advertising on candidate evaluation and the likelihood of voting. Presented at the annual conference of the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Advertising Division, Boston, MA.